Bible Study – Jesus On Trial – The Verdict

At the end of our last episode, Pilate had told the Jews “I find no guilt in the man“, and when he finds out that Jesus is a Galilean, he decides to pawn Jesus off on Herod, who was the regional-governor of Galilee. After Herod has his fun with Jesus, he passed Him back to Pilate, who rendered the final-verdict.

I find no fault
4 Then Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, “I find no guilt in this man.” 5 But they kept on insisting, saying, “He stirs up the people, teaching all over Judea, starting from Galilee even as far as this place.”

First, we must understand that Pilate was judging Jesus based on Roman law, NOT Jewish law. Pilate didn’t have any jurisdiction over religious-disputes, only over things pertaining to Roman law; hence he HAD to acquit Jesus of any wrong-doing.

“He stirs up the people, teaching all over Judea, starting from Galilee even as far as this place.” Again, the Jews were grasping at straws, because, since Jesus wasn’t stirring up any kind of rebellion, He wasn’t doing anything “wrong“, even if the Jews didn’t like it.

6 When Pilate heard it, he asked whether the man was a Galilean. 7 And when he learned that He belonged to Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent Him to Herod, who himself also was in Jerusalem at that time.

Jesus before Herod
8 Now Herod was very glad when he saw Jesus; for he had wanted to see Him for a long time, because he had been hearing about Him and was hoping to see some sign performed by Him. 9 And he questioned Him at some length; but He answered him nothing. 10 And the chief priests and the scribes were standing there, accusing Him vehemently. 11 And Herod with his soldiers, after treating Him with contempt and mocking Him, dressed Him in a gorgeous robe and sent Him back to Pilate. 12 Now Herod and Pilate became friends with one another that very day; for before they had been enemies with each other. (Luke 23:4-12)

What was Herod hoping to get out of Jesus? Was he hoping Jesus would turn some more water into wine, or did he have some other “magic-trick” in mind? There was no way that he couldn’t have heard about Jesus, because He was well-known in all of Galilee. Whatever he had been hoping for, he wasn’t going to get, and Jesus just let everyone ramble on, and didn’t even say a word.

What were the chief priests and scribes doing there? They didn’t go into Pilate’s chambers lest they become “unclean“, so how was it different going into Herod’s chambers?

Again, there was no love-lost between the Jews and the Romans, so the Romans couldn’t pass up an opportunity to abuse, mistreat, and generally-humiliate any Jew they got their hands on, and Jesus was no exception, with a twist…And Herod with his soldiers, after treating Him with contempt and mocking Him, dressed Him in a gorgeous robe and sent Him back to Pilate. They got a jab in at the Jews…by treating Jesus as a “king“.

Why had there been “bad-blood” between Pilate and Herod? Did they both have “king-size-egos“? Whatever it was, passing Jesus back and forth between them patched-up their differences.

Back to Pilate
And when he had said this, he went out again to the Jews and said to them, “I find no guilt in Him. 39 But you have a custom that I release someone for you at the Passover; do you wish then that I release for you the King of the Jews?” 40 So they cried out again, saying, “Not this Man, but Barabbas.” Now Barabbas was a robber. (John 18:38-40)

The Jews weren’t accepting a “prisoner-swap”. They wanted Jesus dead, and the sooner the better. Barabbas wasn’t just a “common-thief”, he had been imprisoned for rebellion and murder (Luke 23:25). That they would prefer for Barabbas to be loose on the streets speaks volumes about their character, or lack thereof. They were going to get their way by hook or by crook.

The Crown of Thorns
19 Pilate then took Jesus and scourged Him. 2 And the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and put it on His head, and put a purple robe on Him; 3 and they began to come up to Him and say, “Hail, King of the Jews!” and to give Him slaps in the face. 4 Pilate came out again and said to them, “Behold, I am bringing Him out to you so that you may know that I find no guilt in Him.” 5 Jesus then came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. Pilate said to them, “Behold, the Man!” 6 So when the chief priests and the officers saw Him, they cried out saying, “Crucify him, crucify him!” Pilate said to them, “Take Him yourselves and crucify Him, for I find no guilt in Him.” 7 The Jews answered him, “We have a law, and by that law He ought to die because He made Himself out to be the Son of God.”

As if crucifixion wasn’t going to be grueling-enough, the Romans scourged their prisoners first. Pilate was also hoping that scourging Jesus would pacify the mob. Prisoners to be scourged were stripped naked, tied to either a whipping post or a flogging-tree, and scourged by trained-floggers using what can best be described as a “cat-o-nine-tails“. It was a short whip with several loose ends, to which were affixed many pieces of bone, rock or metal. It was devastatingly-effective, and left whatever it touched shredded and bloody. Prisoners were normally scourged until they were nearly dead.

2 And the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and put it on His head, and put a purple robe on Him; 3 and they began to come up to Him and say, “Hail, King of the Jews!” and to give Him slaps in the face. Not content to have just scourged Jesus, they put a purple robe on Him (purple was the sign of nobility) and a crown of thorns on His head.

4 Pilate came out again and said to them, “Behold, I am bringing Him out to you so that you may know that I find no guilt in Him.” 5 Jesus then came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. Pilate said to them, “Behold, the Man!” By that time, Jesus didn’t look very “kingly” even though He was dressed in a purple robe. He was probably stooped, maybe even bent-over due to the pain and blood-loss, so He was no “threat” to anyone.

Behold the man.” What the crowd was “beholding” was a man broken by torture. Bleeding, beaten, bruised and in a condition fit only for the Emergency Room, there stood Jesus not looking like much of a threat to anyone. The bloodthirsty crowds led by their “holy” religious leaders go crazy demanding his crucifixion. It could be that Pilate thought they would be appeased by the sight; if so he was mistaken. His frustration is clearly evident when he says, “You crucify him!” The Jews will not relent; they want their Messiah dead and silenced once and for all.

6 So when the chief priests and the officers saw Him, they cried out saying, “Crucify him, crucify him!” Seeing Jesus already badly-beaten only fueled the mob’s blood-thirstiness. They wanted Jesus dead, and NOW.

Pilate said to them, “Take Him yourselves and crucify Him, for I find no guilt in Him.” Pilate, based on Roman-law, had already exceeded his obligation to discover the facts of the case. When he said “I find no guilt in Him.” he had rendered a legal-verdict. He also wanted to wash his hands of this whole mess. Actually, his suggestion “Take Him yourselves and crucify Him” was against Roman-law because only the Romans could legally-execute a prisoner.

7 The Jews answered him, “We have a law, and by that law He ought to die because He made Himself out to be the Son of God.” If Jesus had not been truly the Son of God, the Jews would have been right, but they had chosen to ignore all the evidence that Jesus was/is the Son of God. Jesus hadn’t fit into their “Messiah-model”, so they had rejected Him as their long-awaited Messiah. They were looking for a “conquering-king”, not a “suffering-servant”. How many times had they read the “Suffering Servant” prophesies in Isaiah?

8 Therefore when Pilate heard this statement, he was even more afraid; 9 and he entered into the Praetorium again and said to Jesus, “Where are You from?” But Jesus gave him no answer. 10 So Pilate said to Him, “You do not speak to me? Do You not know that I have authority to release You, and I have authority to crucify You?” 11 Jesus answered, “You would have no authority over Me, unless it had been given you from above; for this reason he who delivered Me to you has the greater sin.” 12 As a result of this Pilate made efforts to release Him, but the Jews cried out saying, “If you release this Man, you are no friend of Caesar; everyone who makes himself out to be a king opposes Caesar.”

Pilate was still “stuck between a rock and a hard-spot“, because even though Roman law was all that really mattered to him, he WAS still the governor, and if a riot broke out, he had to be prepared to quell it by force if necessary. He knew that he had to “keep the peace” somehow.

9 and he entered into the Praetorium again and said to Jesus, “Where are You from?” Pilate was still on a fact-finding mission, so “Where are you from?” was a reasonable question; however Jesus still wasn’t telling him anything. If Jesus had told him that He was from above, Pilate wouldn’t have believed it anyway.

10 So Pilate said to Him, “You do not speak to me? Do You not know that I have authority to release You, and I have authority to crucify You?” Pilate arrogantly-assumed that HE was the “final-authority“, but Jesus had other news for him. 11 Jesus answered, “You would have no authority over Me, unless it had been given you from above; for this reason he who delivered Me to you has the greater sin.” God was the “final-authority“, NOT Pilate. Jesus called his bluff in a very-dramatic way and He also placed ultimate-accountability on the Jewish religious leaders. Pilate was really just a pawn.

12 As a result of this Pilate made efforts to release Him, but the Jews cried out saying, “If you release this Man, you are no friend of Caesar; everyone who makes himself out to be a king opposes Caesar.”

Why did the Jews suddenly become “loyal” to Caesar? Was their “loyalty” a “loyalty-of-convenience“? Pilate certainly wasn’t going have his loyalty to Caesar questioned, particularly if there was any chance that it might get back to Caesar. That would have been the end of his political-career.

13 Therefore when Pilate heard these words, he brought Jesus out, and sat down on the judgment seat at a place called The Pavement, but in Hebrew, Gabbatha. 14 Now it was the day of preparation for the Passover; it was about the sixth hour. And he said to the Jews, “Behold, your King!” 15 So they cried out, “Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him!” Pilate said to them, “Shall I crucify your King?” The chief priests answered, “We have no king but Caesar.”

13 Therefore when Pilate heard these words, he brought Jesus out, and sat down on the judgment seat at a place called The Pavement, but in Hebrew, Gabbatha. It was time for Pilate to render his official-verdict, so he took Jesus out to the “judgment-seat” where all trial-verdicts were rendered.

And he said to the Jews, “Behold, your King!” Pilate couldn’t have been more right when he said “Behold your King”, but all it did was to rile the mob up even more. 15 So they cried out, “Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him!” The more Pilate tried to spare Jesus, the more blood-thirsty they became. Pilate said to them, “Shall I crucify your King?” The chief priests answered, “We have no king but Caesar.

By saying “We have no king but Caesar“, the Jews were blatantly-denying that God was their “king“, thus throwing-off any obligation to obey the Law of God, except whatever was “advantageous” to them and their cause. That was blatant-idolatry. The Jews, by their actions so-far, have already revealed the depths of their apostasy, and if there had been any doubt about it, “We have no king but Caesar” just sealed it. And these people were the “religious-leaders“? What kind of cult had they dreamed-up?

16 So he then handed Him over to them to be crucified. (John 19:1-16)

Why did Pilate go from “I find no guilt in Him.” to handing Jesus over to be crucified?

We will answer that question and look at Jesus’ crucifixion and burial next time.

Sola Deo Gloria!

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